Alan Kushan

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Miscellaneous Cogitations of an  Artist:

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The Article By Richard Horowitz

Posted on April 7, 2010 at 9:40 PM

Alan Kushan is about tuning, very subtle tuning! Everything about him is in tune. He builds his beautifully crafted one-of-a-kind bass Santurs from the finest oriental wood and adds extra bass strings and resonators allowing him to create a new harmonic pallet capable of exploring what he calls "the origins of our questions".


Not satisfied with answers to his questions, he is seeking the fundamental human need to question with every stroke he makes, with every breath he takes.


He is in fact on a QUEST.


And of course he is seeking on macro- and microcosmic levels at one and the same time. The perfect chord found recently by scientists at the origin of the Big Bang (see Scientific American, February 2004) has found a perfect messenger, a perfect resonator.


When listening to Alan's music one instinctively feels the great forces of the Universe at work and the Necessity of Elemental Risk he faces as his creations explode from within him. He understands that it is only this extreme level of risk that will unlock the deepest emotions and questions.


Nonetheless he achieves an inspiring degree of compositional elegance more often than not. And it is not the superficial compositional "elegance" so popular these days created by endless variations of repeating arpeggios complacently pulsing away always so confident that they are the "music of the future"- our nice clean computerized, anaesthetized academic future.


The best examples are noted for their complexity and for the mathematical thought process of the composer. Arguably these well thought out usually flawless arpeggios dutifully written down on paper for musicians to read (musicians who will play them with glossy intonation and embouchures devoid of dissonance and character) may, at the highest level, "describe" or reflect some existing repetitive process in nature, but personally I am not interested in hearing the composer thinking when I listen to music.


I want to hear the music. What I hear in Alan's music is an understanding of the ancient reasons for making music in the first place. And yes, it is about effecting a change in frequency on a genetic level, and about healing. Most of the arpeggio music has little to do with nuance.


It is fast or slow, loud or soft, but it is not really expressive, it does not understand how to approach a note and how to say goodbye. The arpeggio notes have no intrinsic value, they are just foot-soldiers in the Composition.


Kushan understands that notes are TONES and some have sharp edges, some have frail tails. Some need to be caressed, hovered over like a bee pollinating a flower. Some notes are like a beautiful woman seen from a distance. If you don't approach in just the right way she won't speak to you. Sometimes the tones are his friends and sometimes his enemies. Sometimes he seduces them, sometimes they seduce him.


I visualize Alan playing in outer space at the farthest edge of the expanding universe. Tones are flying at him from light years ahead. Playing them is a matter of life and death. If he can just play them

all with perfect emotion they will all become one tone and he will have just one last stroke to play.


Of course it isn't fair to blame only the new redundant music. This subtle microtonal aspect of music (the tuning may be subtle but the effect can be shocking or profoundly moving) started to disappear in the West when the improvisational creativity required to travel from one note to the next became less important than playing three notes at the same time in harmony.


Kushan knows the secrets of quarter tone music. He knows that creating a quarter tone motif is like slipping a slippery thread through an infinitesimally small needle hole and that out the other side will come massive expression.


And yes, this recording is flawed : things could be neater, mixed better, presented cleaner, but fuck it ! What you hear is a deep personal truth recreating itself at every turn. With a deep listening the flaws only add to the dramatic tension as Kushan's galaxies spiral into one another. You hear a master musician and virtuoso willing to sacrifice virtuosity in favour of meaning.


You hear a man who has studied the most refined forms of Persian and Indian classical and vocal music, and who is still in touch with the ritual and shamanistic power that is at the origin of his talent. And he is lucid, utterly flexible and utterly taut : as taut as the strings on his santur. He is a martial artist with an acute awareness of every muscle group.


Seeing him play is of course a series of utterly captivating, utterly trance-inducing, utterly unutterable unutterables ! Think : the intensity and scope of Varese and John and Alice Coltrane and the grace of Satie and Ravel focussed into Raga and Dastgah. Are you starting to get the point ? Or do I need to go on ? How long is this review supposed to be anyhow?

                                                                       Richard Horowitz


Winter Solstice 2004


The following was written while listening to the CD, not before,

not after.


#1 The Karatesque deftness of Kushan's ultra-light mallets generate a relentless macrospiral that collides with the percussion as if it were the beginning of a cosmic battle with gravity itself, which in Kushan's ultra-fluid world is either the same as or the origin of memory (since gravity is now thought to act interdimensionally on the dissonance in the overtone structure to create matter, as it were, according to Jaron).


#2 The Santur is a spider web trapping an exotic bird made of microtonal wind : the tables devour the winds.


#3 The Santur is a billion-year-long humming bird feasting on the carcass of a black hole : the beat shifts and a ritual footless waltz turns on an axis of split-seconds.


#4 Darkness, dissonance, expectation : one of Kushan's most tight-roped moments ! Echoes of Zarathustra. The introduction leads down the path to a cave where dreams are stored. There is a throne made of vibrating unstruck strings ; on it sits Kushan's perfectly disembodied voice luring us to a circular hole at the top of the cave. We rise and converge with him into the night sky.


#5 Warmth, confidence, courage ! Mahour Alan is flying over his most precious memories.


#6 A dense nucleus of thought forms shape, shift in waves of melismas.


#7 Raga Todhi Kushan attacks shadows of overtones with mallets made of fire and tears. His voice glides over the buzzing of souls guiding them to the inner secret he has come to reveal.


#8 An old wooden boat arrives on a beach at night. A majestic fire dance and sacrifices are being performed.


#9 The dancers leave the beach and start running through a wide valley. Their eyes are stars shooting solar flares through the mountains. Faster and faster they run, unable to stop. There is no end.

                                                                            Richard Horowitz

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________/

French Version.

Quand on parle d'Alan Kushan, c'est de l'accord qu'on parle, un accord très subtil. Tout à propos de lui est accordé. Il façonne ses santurs, unique en leur genre et travaillés à la perfection, à partir du bois d'Orient le plus délicat, tout en ajoutant des cordes et des résonateurs de basse lui permettant de créer une palette harmonique neuve capable d'explorer ce qu'il appelle "les origines de nos questions".


N'étant pas satisfait des réponses à ses questions, à chaque coup de son instrument, à chaque souffle qu'il prend, il est à la recherche du besoin humain viscéral de tout mettre en cause. En vérité, il s'agit bel et bien d'une quête.


Et évidemment l'acte de chercher pour lui s'exécute aux niveaux à la fois macro- et microcosmiques. Le "parfait accord" à l'origine du Big Bang découvert tout dernièrement par les scientifiques (voir le Scientific American de février 2004) vient donc de trouver un messager idéal, un résonateur parfait.


En écoutant la musique d'Alan on ressent, tout à fait instinctivement, d'une part les grandes forces de l'univers qui s'agitent, d'autre part la nécessité de risque élémental à laquelle il fait face au fur et à mesure que ses créations explosent en provenance de son for intérieur.


Lui comprend bien que seul cet extrême niveau de risque est en mesure de déverrouiller les sentiments et les questions les plus profonds. Nonobstant cela il atteint le plus souvent un degré d'élégance compositionnelle qui suscite l'inspiration.


Cependant il ne s'agit pas là de cette "élégance" compositionnelle tellement en vogue de nos jours, créée à partir de variations sans cesse d'arpèges qui se répètent et qui palpitent d'un air suffisant, tout en prétendant avec confiance être "la musique de l'avenir" - notre avenir sympa et bien propre, informatisé, insensibilisé, et bien académique.


Les meilleurs exemples de ce phénomène sont notés tant en vertu de leur complexité qu'à travers le processus de pensée mathémathique du compositeur. Certes, on peut soutenir que ces arpèges bien conçus, d'habitude sans défaut, dûment écrits sur du papier pour que les musiciens puissent les lire (des musiciens qui les joueront d'une intonation luisante, accompagnée d'embouchures privées de dissonance et de caractère), pourront bien, au niveau le plus élevé, "décrire" ou miroiter quelque processus répétitif existant au sein de la nature, mais quant à moi, personnellement, il n'y a aucun intérêt à écouter le train de pensée du compositeur chaque fois que j'ai envie d'écouter la musique.


En effet, je veux entendre la musique. Ce que j'entends à travers la musique d'Alan, c'est une compréhension des raisons anciennes remontant dans le passé pour lesquelles on devrait faire de la musique en premier lieu. Et oui, il s'agit bel et bien d'effectuer un changement de fréquence à un niveau génétique, ainsi que de la guérison.


La plus grande partie de la musique d'arpège a très peu à faire avec la nuance. Elle est rapide ou lente, forte ou douce, mais elle n'est pas vraiment expressive, elle ne comprend pas comment on s'approche d'une note, ni comment on dit au revoir.


Les notes d'arpège n'ont aucune valeur intrinsèque, elles ne sont que des fantassins dans la Composition. Kushan a bien compris que les notes sont des TONS : parmi ces notes, quelques-unes ont des bords tranchants, d'autres des queues fragiles, alors que quelques-unes ont besoin d'être caressées, telle cette fleur au-dessus de laquelle voltige l'abeille pour la féconder en pollen.


Il y a des notes d'ailleurs qui ont l'air d'une belle femme vue de loin. Si vous ne vous approchez pas d'elle juste comme il faut, elle ne vous parlera pas.


Tantôt arrive-t-il que les tons sont des amis à lui, tantôt des ennemis. Tantôt il les séduit, tantôt eux le séduisent. Je m'imagine Alan qui joue de son instrument dans l'espace cosmique aux confins les plus éloignés de l'univers en expansion.


Des tons volent vers lui, venant d'années-lumière en avant. Les jouer, c'est une question de vie ou de mort. Si seulement il peut les jouer tous d'une émotion parfaite, ceux-ci se transformeront en un seul ton, et lui, il n'aura alors qu'un seul dernier coup à jouer.


Bien sûr, ce ne serait pas juste de blâmer uniquement la nouvelle musique redondante. Cet aspect subtil microtonal de la musique (l'accord peut être bien subtil, mais l'effet en peut être choquant, voire profondément émouvant) avait commencé à disparaître en Occident lorsque la créativité improvisationnelle exigée pour voyager d'une note à l'autre est devenue moins importante que le fait de jouer de trois notes à la fois et en harmonie. Kushan connaît les secrets de la musique à la noire.


Il sait que le fait de créer un motif à la noire ressemble à l'acte de faire passer un fil glissant par un trou d'aiguille infiniment petit : de l'autre côté s'élance l'expression massive.


Et oui, cet enregistrement a ses défauts : les choses pourraient être plus ingénieuses, le mixage plus à point, le tout aurait pu être mieux présenté, mais merde ! Ce qu'on entend, c'est une vérité personnelle profonde qui ne cesse pas de se recréer à tout instant. En écoutant de très près on constate que les défauts ne font qu'ajouter à la tension dramatique pendant que les galaxies de Kushan tournent en spirale l'une dans l'autre.


Vous entendez un maître-musicien et virtuose qui a la volonté d'immoler la virtuosité à l'autel du sens. Vous entendez un homme qui a étudié les formes les plus raffinées de la musique classique et vocale persane et indienne, et qui est toujours au courant quant au pouvoir ritualiste et shamaniste dont puise son talent.


Et il est lucide, totalement malléable et totalement tendu : aussi tendu que les cordes sur son santur. C'est un adepte des arts martiaux possédant une conscience aiguë de chaque groupement musculaire.


Il va de soi qu'en le voyant jouer on témoigne d'une série d'expressions totalement inouiës, complètement captivantes, ce qui vous fait tomber en transe ! Figurez-vous : l'intensité et la portée de Varese et de John et Alice Coltrane et la grâce de Satie et de Ravel concentrées en Raga et Dastgah. Avez-vous commencé à saisir ce qu'on vient de dire là ? Ou est-ce qu'il faut que je continue ? D'ailleurs, de quelle longueur ce compte rendu est-il censé être?

                                                                Richard Horowitz

solstice d'hiver 2004

Ce qui suit avait été écrit en même temps qu'on écoutait le CD, pas avant, pas après.


#1 La dextérité karatesque des maillets ultralégers enfantent une macrospirale impitoyable se heurtant contre la percussion comme s'il s'agissait d'une bataille cosmique avec la gravité elle-même, ce qui, dans le monde ultrafluide de Kushan, équivaut à la mémoire, ou bien constitue l'origine de la mémoire (puisque la gravité est à l'heure actuelle considérée comme agissant de manière interdimensionnelle sur la dissonance au sein de la structure de l'harmonique pour créer de la matière, pour ainsi dire, selon Jaron).


#2 Le santur est une toile d'araignée qui prend au piège un oiseau exotique fait de vent microtonal : les tables dévorent les vents ;


#3 Le santur est un colibri, long d'un milliard d'années, qui se régale du cadavre d'un trou noir : le temps se déplace et le rite du waltz sans pieds se tourne sur un axe de secondes ultra-rapides.


#4 Les ténèbres, la dissonance, l'attente : l'un des moments les plus excitants, les plus frénétiques, à la Kushan. Des échos de Zarathoustra. L'introduction mène le long d'un sentier à une caverne où s'emmagasinent les rêves. Il y a un trône confectionné de cordes vibrantes non frappées ; là-dessus est assise la voix parfaitement désincarnée qui nous séduit vers un trou circulaire en haut de la caverne. Nous montons et convergeons avec lui dans le ciel de nuit.


#5 La chaleur, la confiance, le courage ! Mahour Alan survole ses mémoires les plus précieuses.


#6 Un noyau épais de formes de pensée se développent, se déplacent en vagues de syllabes mélodiques.


#7 Raga Todhi Kushan s'attaque aux ombres des harmoniques au moyen de maillets faits de feu et de larmes. Sa voix avance en glissant au-dessus du bourdonnement d'âmes, les guidant vers le secret interne qu'il lui est arrivé de révéler.


#8 Une vieille barque en bois arrive sur une plage à la nuit. On est train d'exécuter une danse à feu majestique ainsi que des sacrifices.


#9 Les danseurs quittent la plage et se mettent à traverser une large vallée en courant. Leurs yeux sont des étoiles tirant des facules solaires à travers les montagnes. Ils courent de vitesse en vitesse, incapables de s'arrêter.

Ça ne cesse point.

                                                                 Richard Horowitz


 


Roland Schiltknecht & Alan Kushan

Posted on March 25, 2010 at 9:40 PM

Roland Schiltknecht & Alan Kushan


Tunsch

Mensch Records, Switzerland

Swiss hackbretts and the Persian santur combine on this 1999 production and the results do equal the self-ascribed tag "imaginary folk music," but with rock-chamber jazz sonorities not yet encountered else where in the emerging idiom.


The ten 5 to 6 minute excursions all penned by Alpdenizen Schiltknecht are bound with a prolog and epilog by alphornist Roland Dahinden, whose resonant and authentic air charges the dulcimers with high mountain flavor.


Electric bass and drums modernize what would otherwise be some austere and lovely acoustic playing that straddles the new folk recital/improv line.


Tracks with a rhythm section are carried with a single groove strategy that yields expansive travel textures when Schiltknecht & the classically trained Iranian refugee Kushan extemporize over the top. Further dimension is added with violin and cello and occasional wordless vocals.


Much of the music here has a minor key basis, importantly enriched by a large acoustic stage. Friend lier overall than comparable Nordic jazz, thanks to a few major key melodies and waltz meters, this is not quite the traditional/alternative folk of the North side label either.


Schiltknecht notes that "Tunsch" is an old alpine expression for ahuman-like puppet or artificial humanoid, created by shepherds.


However, according to legend, at the end of the alpseason, when the shepherds depart leaving the Tunsch alone, the lonely effigy exacts horrible revenge on them.


Which would explain the small exhibition of somewhat menacing, primitivistic charcoal drawings which accompany the attractive black & white booklet.


More lore appears in an ancient alpine (originally Sicilian) cultural utterance chanted in "Sator Formula" which purportedly wards off evil, fire, drought and other natural calamities.


Tunsch is a handsome, impressionistic album of contemporary music making, intuitively informed by myth and the purity of folk life yet it escapes typing or direct comparison with any similar developments else where in Europe. Quite a find from rural and unexpectedly urbane back country. 


Steve Taylor

 


Who is out there?

Posted on March 24, 2010 at 12:55 AM

Who is out there?


As long as I can remember, I have always been fascinated by the unlimited source of energy that shapes the magical mysteries of the universe. Certainly it is a great challenge forman's physical and mental capacities to comprehend the true dimensionsof such an enigma.

This hidden phenomenon perhaps reveals itself only to those who, on a subconscious level, travel between these dimensions, and this is the reason why some composers have "lived" so long eventhough they have been physically dead for some time.

Since man is unaware of his origins, he cannot explain the source of this life of "musical sounds". We are left to believe that we mimic many sounds of nature, and the recordings that astronomical research has made hitherto of the sounds of this musical, outer space, do not translate as "music"to our ears.


Hence, our knowledge of musical sound scapes as a whole, whether it is projected from the depths of our planet or outer space, is going to remain limited.


With the arrival of technology our vision and understanding of musical sounds has changed immensely, and the new direction of perceptual manipulation in music creates an enormous bazaar of musicians around the world with only one objective to achieve: popularity.


However, speaking for myself, I would rather continue with my metaphorical observations of this energetic life form that shapes the entire universe, with a view to fully embracing and comprehending the quintessence of this energy.

I sincerely believe that, from all the sounds that we are surrounded by on this planet, be it oceanic sounds or those sounds that are produced by animals of all sorts, including those that we have created (for example, the sound of machines, the sound of musical symphonies), we react only to a small percentage of them, such as the song of a nightingale, the roar of a lion or the chug of a train.


In other words, we are unable to perceive sounds that come from deep space, such as the sound of the earth revolving around the sun, the sound of a comet speeding by, and the sound of a collapsing star.


I think that the work of most composers is often limited to their times, seasons and eras, and this is mainly due to the limited knowledge of the origin of sound as a life force.


The musicians/artists in exile

Posted on March 23, 2010 at 10:46 AM

The musicians/artists in exile


For many Iranian artists living in exile, there are always the elementsof fear, doubt and self-aggrandizement.


Add to this the great disunity and general lack of solidarity amongst most Iranian people, who have originally never been "informed" (i.e. could be deemed "deficient") with regard to art and culture, either inside or outside the country,and the result is Iranian artists living in exile that have never been able to establish themselves within a powerful, united, and influential community.


 Artistic moods


Because of insufficient work for many amateur as well as professional musicians outside Iran, and the ghastly music politics inside thecountry, an unpleasant atmosphere has been generated amongst the artists in general, aggravated

by a pervasive disrespect.


 A musical picture


Usually speaking, the four main properties of musical sounds are witch; dynamics; tone colour; and last, but not least, duration.


These facts are very important, as they are based on the organization of the sounds in the time continuum, and indeed thus far this has been alogical state of affairs in the eyes of many musical experts.


The story of Persian/Iranian music


There are not sufficient fundamental facts to support Persian music before the infamous foreign invasions mentioned earlier.


Today’s Iranian music has its own offbeat reasons and logical basics. However, it is not based on any scientific

facts or, for lack of a better sentence, does not possess a "Western" logical system as its origin.


The truth is that there are not many historical facts to support Persian music, and its full function in Persian/Iranian society, so it would be safe to state that 90% of what we experience musically in today’s Iran is perhaps not even 200 years old.


Musicians have often presented their own respective esoteric musical interpretations.


This is commonly known as "dast-be-sineh" music (literally: "chest-to-chest" music).


Most of this music is a combination of Arab and Mongolian music. But from around 1924 onwards (as indicated earlier) some educated musicians, upon their return from the West, started to put together a collection of folk music pieces, as well as some more instrumental exercise pieces that today are known as "Radif" or aptly said "National Music".


 Iranian/Persian musicians across the ages


Before and during the time of the Qajar dynasty, musicians mainly entertained the feudal lords, land usurpers, and rich government officials.


Musicians were entirely dependent on a very small allowance,and in many cases, even, they only received food and accommodation, and nothing else.


They were usually regarded as a "commodity" deployed to musically entertain foreign guests, and the rich generally, whilst the latter indulged in their private pleasures, during receptions and parties, opium-smoking ceremonies, and other hedonistic pursuits, such as fornication in their "harems".  



The minorities in Iran

Posted on March 23, 2010 at 10:45 AM

 Laalezaar Street


The Qajar king Mozafaredin Shah ordered the construction of a replica of Paris’ Champs-Elysées in Teheran.


This later came to be known as"Laalezaar Street", whose small theatres were to become the centre of artistic activity for musicians and other artists.


Among these was a favourite haunt for many musicians, the "Kaffe-Kabbareh" (Café Cabaret), a second-rate cheap imitation cabaret-theatre in the European tradition.


This idea alone, however, exposed many Iranians to a more accessible, "Westernized" artistic endeavour, and this lasted right up to the period of the late Shah, hence well into the late 1970s.


The seartistic activities were considered to belong to Iranian "high society", and were culturally "Western".


Despite the fact that what was consumed of the Western tradition was its superficial side, the art of music and musical activity in general, which had hitherto been viewed disparagingly as shameful and "low-born", was gradually gaining inrespectability, with the welcome upshot that young Iranians now dared to contemplate some semblance of a musical career.


Nevertheless, this having been said, there still exists a fair amount of prejudice and irreverence towards musicians and artists in general, and this is largely due, alas, to Iran’s lost cultural legacy.


The minorities in Iran


Many minorities, such as those of Jewish, Zoroastrian or Armenian origin, were regarded as "infidels" or "unclean", and were generally despised and condemned,even though they were flourishing in the arts and cultivating many artistic activities, such as instrument-making, teaching music, dance and singing.


Seeing as society at large suffered from poverty and disease, these artists were forced to live the life of the underdog and work at whatever jobs were available to make ends meet, whilst at the same time they were to remain, in their capacity as "entertainers", at the beck-and-call of the so-called "high-class" society we have had occasion to mention earlier.



Art and the human quest.

Posted on March 23, 2010 at 10:38 AM

Art and the human quest


Truly it would be very hard to explain or articulate what is art, or at least what we call art, within the parameters of man’s boundaries, even if one could.


First, one needs to understand and be clear about the record of the past itself.


For indeed, in order to come to terms with the present and the future, we must struggle to understand the past.


The element that constitutes our present can be likened to a factory with a long, endless, invisible assembly line.


Standing before this long, endless and invisible assembly line, which I call Time, is Man himself, experiencing life passing before his eyes with unimaginable celerity.


Undoubtedly, we do not know who was the first and who is the last in this unstoppable race.


Nothing is settled, and no one has the wisdom or the capacity to unveil the Truth that mysteriously allows us to continue forward. We are merely speculating.


A brief history of sound


As long as I can remember, music has lived in my soul, and playing the hammer dulcimer or Santur has been the medium I have chosen in order to penetrate the sounds of the unseen and untouched galaxies.


Yet, I have not been able to apprehend why this phenomenon is so complex to unraveland why our physical capabilities are so restricted.


I am truly fascinated by the unlimited source of energy that shapes the magical mysteries of the universe.


Certainly it is a great challenge for man's physical and mental capacities to comprehend the true dimensions of such an enigma.


This hidden phenomenon perhaps reveals itself only to those who, on a subconscious level, travel between these dimensions, and this is the reason why some composers have "lived" so long even though they have been physically dead for some time.


Since man is unaware of his origins, he cannot explain the source of this life of "musical sounds". We are left to believe that we mimic many sounds of nature, and the recordings that astronomical research has made hitherto of the sounds of this musical “outer space” do not translate as "music" to our ears.


Hence, our knowledge of musical soundscapes as a whole, whether it is projected from the depths of our planet or outer space, is going to remain limited.


With the arrival of technology our vision and understanding of musical sounds has changed immensely, and the new direction of perceptual manipulation in music creates an enormous bazaar of musicians around the world with only one objective to achieve: popularity.


However, speaking for myself, I would rather continue with my metaphorical observations of this energetic life form that shapes the entire universe, with a view to fully embracing and comprehending the quintessence of this energy.


I sincerely believe that, from all the sounds that we are surrounded by on this planet, be it oceanic sounds or those sounds that are produced by animals of all sorts, including those that we have created (for example, the sound of machines, the sound of musical symphonies), we react only to a small percentage of them, such as the song of a nightingale, the roar of a lion or the chug of a train.


In other words, we are unable to perceive sounds that come from deep space, such as the sound of the earth revolving around the sun, the sound of a comet speeding by, and the sound of a collapsing star.


I think that the work of most composers is often limited to their times, seasons and eras, and this is mainly due to the limited knowledge of the origin of sound as a life force.


Geometry in Music.

Posted on March 23, 2010 at 12:47 AM

Geometry in Music.

 

The sound of music, regardless of whether it is produced by an instrument such as a guitar, or a human voice, is always going to be limited foras long as we haven’t achieved a better understanding of our feeling sand emotions.


What is the geometry of these senses we call “feelings”, and where do they come from?  No one knows exactly. What have we discovered so far?  The Seven Deadly Sins, perhaps? What is “pride”, for instance? Can one really think that in the geometry of music there can be “pride” between sounds, or musical notes?


Can one say that these sounds or notes “hate”one another?


The civilization that has been created by humankind, together with the thousands of musical instruments that have come into being during its advance, could scarcely be said to be ancient when compared to the age of the earth, or the universe for that matter.


So here we are, still puzzling in search of the “perfect sound” and the cryptic element that should produce that.


Nowadays we are pushing ourselves more and more towards the technology that might help us create this quintessential sound.


Computer software attempts to provide us with the mechanics necessary to create sounds that gratify our insatiable appetite, as reflected in the proverbia l“lust” and “gluttony” that relentlessly drive us to wish to profit from the power of technology in all are as of human activity.


Thus it is that this “civilization of mechanics” has not even spared the musical realm. In all the musical sounds that humankind has ever put together heretofore we have the echoes of the Seven Deadly Sins, clearly audible and ever-reverberating.


Now the question remains: Without the power of sounds, can we live at all?

 

 



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